Trials

Dr. Andy Nemechek presenting on the "Scope of contemporary Cancer Care

Dr. Andy Nemechek presenting on the "Scope of contemporary Cancer Care

CCRP is a key player in the development and implementation of cutting edge clinical trials as well as innovative treatment protocols that offer patients an entirely new spectrum of options and REAL hope for extending and saving lives. Cancers that were previously a certain death sentence upon diagnosis are now treatable and even survivable.  CCRP partners with hospitals, community clinics and physicians through-out Colorado as well as in Wyoming, so that patients have local access in their own communities to cutting edge cancer treatment. In 2017, CCRP anticipates to have more than 70 trials open, with nearly 300 individuals taking part and another 1,500 followed for their health status post treatment. 

List of clinical trials

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Colorado Gives Day features a $1 Million Incentive Fund, created by Community First Foundation and FirstBank. It is one of the largest gives-day incentive funds in the country. Every donation made through ColoradoGives.org on Colorado Gives Day is boosted by the incentive fund, which increases the value of every dollar. For example, if CCRP receives 10 percent of the total donations made on Colorado Gives Day, that same nonprofit receives 10 percent of the $1 Million Incentive Fund. Use this link to donate on December 5th: https://www.coloradogives.org/ccrp/overview#profile-details

Colorado Gives Day features a $1 Million Incentive Fund, created by Community First Foundation and FirstBank. It is one of the largest gives-day incentive funds in the country.

Every donation made through ColoradoGives.org on Colorado Gives Day is boosted by the incentive fund, which increases the value of every dollar. For example, if CCRP receives 10 percent of the total donations made on Colorado Gives Day, that same nonprofit receives 10 percent of the $1 Million Incentive Fund.

Use this link to donate on December 5th:

https://www.coloradogives.org/ccrp/overview#profile-details

CCRP Spotlight

                   Dr. Nick DiBella Featured in
                        the Aurora Sentinel
 
Dr. Nick DiBella, CCRP Board Chair Emeritus and co-Founder, featured in the Aurora Sentinel article below.

Dr. Nick DiBella, CCRP Board Chair Emeritus and co-Founder, featured in the Aurora Sentinel article below.

 

Dr. Nicholas DiBella has seen the evolution of cancer treatment first hand and been a part of important breakthroughs in oncology.

He helped found Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers 25 years ago. That has transformed into US Oncology, which treats more than 850,000 patients across the United States annually. He’s been a part of scores of clinical trials that have helped get to market drugs that have transformed how doctors treat cancer and extend lives of patients. He’s been recognized by his peers for his importance to the field of oncology.

But ask DiBella about his 45 years in the field, about the medical breakthroughs that have completely revolutionized the treatment of cancer, about how the field has changed, and he’s overtaken by emotion thinking of the patients over his long career who didn’t get to benefit from the advancements today.

“When I was in the Army, we had young men dying of testicular cancer,” DiBella said as he took a moment to wipe tears from his eyes and compose himself. “Now we expect to cure every one of them. The explosion in the science has been amazing… When I started we were using chemotherapy drugs, and you’d just blast away and hope the patient could survive and the tumor would die. It was not predictable.”

DiBella’s connection with his patients, their successes and struggles is apparent the moment he starts to discuss his career. And it’s apparent for his patients who have worked with DiBella.

Kent Hutcheson has been a patient, and a friend of DiBella’s, since he started treatment with him over a decade ago. Hutcheson, who founded the non-profit organization Colorado UpLift, said it’s not just DiBella’s medical expertise that makes him such a good doctor. It’s the compassion he brings into treatment.

“I’ve been battling (cancer) for practically 10 years, and he’s kept me alive. And so in that time, what I’ve learned is the unique thing about Dr. DiBella is you’re not just a patient to him,”  Hutcheson said. “He’s a guy you connect with as a person. And I know he can’t do this with everybody, but we have just became good friends, and we’ve shared the journey together through my treatment.”

The field of oncology has completely transformed now, DiBella said, and instead of trying one of a handful of cancer treatment drugs available in the ‘60s and ‘70s, now specific therapies can target certain genes to harness the body’s own cells to fight cancers.

While he’s stepped back from some of his duties in the past three years, as a part of RMCC, DiBella has been a part of numerous drug trials. Those trials have helped test new treatments that have extended the lives of patients and cured cancers that in the beginning of his career would have been a death sentence.

“We, in the private practice community setting, can be much more flexible and efficient in getting these drugs tested. In fact we probably average half as long as the academic centers to accrue the parties through the clinical trials,” DiBella said.

Clinical trials can be a way for patients who are faced with poor odds of survival to find a way to extend their life and possibly beat their cancer. DiBella said RMCC works to make sure patients know not only the possible benefits of the experimental treatments, but also all the risks that come with it.

But for all the excitement that new treatments and cure rates have brought, DiBella is concerned about the future of his field. While new treatments will help continue to increase the rates of survival, the more expensive medicine becomes the harder it will be for patients to access the drugs that could help them live long, productive lives.

For someone who cares and connects with their patients as much as DiBella does, he sees it as a disgrace that cures are there but access is not.

“I’m certain there are people who are not getting the treatment they need throughout the country now,” DiBella said. “Healthcare is the biggest cause of bankruptcy in this country. That shouldn’t be.… If we can spend $15 billion on an aircraft carrier, we can fix medicine with $15 billion and make sure every American got health care.  By Ramsey Scott, 11.9.17

Support Us

the team from Manna Restaurant (at Castle rock adventist hospital), a birdy sponsor for our 2017 Drive for the cure golf tournament

the team from Manna Restaurant (at Castle rock adventist hospital), a birdy sponsor for our 2017 Drive for the cure golf tournament

The National Cancer Institute only partially supports the work of Colorado Cancer Research Program as a community oncology program. The additional support needed to advance cancer research comes from our generous community donors. 

A gift to Colorado Cancer Research Program is a gift of HOPE:

  • HOPE for cancer patients and their families.
  • HOPE for future generations.
  • HOPE for the fight against cancer.

Please consider making a donation of HOPE towards cancer research to treat, control, and prevent the dreaded disease of cancer, and to make a difference in the lives of those affected. All donations are tax deductible. 

Volunteering

Would you like to volunteer at CCRP? Volunteers help with newsletters, assist with special events, attend educational meetings, etc.

If you are interested in volunteering, please contact Lisa Switzer, Director of Development at 303-720-5721 or by e-mail at ccrp@co-cancerresearch.org